Our snowless winter of 2015-16

No heavy snow to weigh down the grasses along Lake Shore East, January 2016 Perhaps we dreamed of a White Christmas in December 2015, but a dream was all it was. And the snow has just kept on not coming. Toronto often has little snow on the ground in January, but this year has been […]

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Remembering our roots

Our dad’s parents in the garden, captioned in our father’s lovely handwriting. Why do you garden? In our family, it’s something you just do – eventually, you become a gardener. For my sister Sarah and I, it’s now as ingrained as family jokes, traditions or recipes. We grew up with parents and grandparents who had […]

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A bouquet for my garden

Thank you, garden, for not being perfect. Thank you for putting up with my sloth. Thanks …for managing to survive, despite my sloth. For reminding me to overcome it. Thank you for offering up continual surprises. Like roses in November. For those sweet doses of happiness, from spring to spring. For showing me what doesn’t […]

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November: Beginning a month of gratitude

Toronto’s skyline from Tommy Thompson Park It’s November. For the past few years on Toronto Gardens, that’s meant #NaBloPoMo – the blogging twin of National Novel Writing Month. Except we write a blog post a day. Just one. While that’s far less than the 50,000-word novel NaNoWriMo writers aim for in 30 days, it can […]

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Gardening can be like a marathon

In winter, I walked past this snowscape on Unwin Avenue (shown through the lens of the Waterlogue app) Spring and fall are the big work seasons for gardeners. They’re also when my other hobby messes up my gardening life. I’m a power-walker. Since 2003, I’ve averaged 3.27 half marathons a year, in spring and/or fall. […]

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Scarification and other life lessons

Glorious sweet peas – wish our blog had smell-o-vision. Some seeds, like sweet peas, must be nicked or scratched to help them germinate. That’s called scarification. Other seeds need to be subjected to long periods of cold; even frozen. Stratified, in horticultural terms. For others, fire is as necessary to the seed as food and […]

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Fling folk are Repeat Befrienders

My photo library includes many pictures of Claire Jones looking decorative. Her blog: The Garden Diaries (Maryland) So, here’s the thing about Fling. You come for the gardens, but you find yourself returning again and again for the people. Who could imagine forging so many long-distance relationships, all bonded by love of gardens. Not me, but […]

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A checkerboard and a chair

The patio in the garden of sculptor Birgit Piskor was actually used to play checkers when this was her childhood home. I love how she kept it when she returned home and made her garden. When the rain and sleet and snow come tomorrow, this is where I’ll be sitting in my mind. Join me?

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