Wordless Wednesday: Irony

If you’ve consulted Baldrick’s Dictionary, you know the definition of Irony. It’s like goldy or bronzy, only it’s made out of iron. I pass these neat examples of irony on my way to my Ryerson class every week. The wonderful coraline railing is on Granby Street, and the archway is between Carleton and Granby. Here […]

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Poem: Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia)

It’s that time again, when walking through certain Toronto neighbourhoods fills your nose with the scent of the black locust tree. These trees are all around the city, originally planted because their hard wood was useful for farm implements. They have a bad-mannered habit of spreading themselves around. You can see them, for example, sprouting […]

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Almost Wordless Wednesday: Texture

You can add texture to your garden in many ways. Here, we have a tulip with fringed petals, one of the many forms (or textures) available in hybrid tulips today. Imagine having two tulip varieties blooming together in the same colour, but with different textures – simple but dramatic. Or try contrast. I don’t know […]

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My AWOL Cat Came Back!

Well he didn’t actually come back: was captured more like it. Fisher, my indoor cat, had been gone most of the week. He’d never been outside, but somehow got out of the house five nights ago. I’ve no idea how; didn’t even know he was gone till next morning. First step was calling and calling, […]

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Wordless Weedsday: Acer platanoides

Yes, weedsday; you read that right. Norway maples, Acer platanoides, Toronto’s most dominant (in so many senses) street tree. You can’t garden in Toronto, especially its east end, without grappling with these non-native giants; trees that are as voracious as they are fecund. But, gee, they have pretty flowers. They’re all chartreuse and fluffy-y.  From […]

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Look who I found under a cabbage leaf

Only two Toronto neighbourhoods with garden-themed names come to my mind. One is Rosedale, north of Bloor Street edged on the east by the forested slopes of the Don Valley. Its winding streets are lined with grand, historic mansions. Rosedale got its name from the profusion of wild roses that once grew on the hillsides […]

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Snowdrop Alert, March 2010

We interrupt our regularly scheduled programming to bring you… snowdrops! Finally. In sooth, they made their appearance in my garden on Sunday, but I was too imprisoned by a school project to do anything about it. But even March 7th is two weeks later than last year, despite the city’s lack of snow. Welcome snowdrops. […]

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Ice Formations: Winter Inflorescence

  We take our garden “blooms” where we can in winter. No, I’m not talking flowers. Pollinators, please stay tucked in your nests, we’re not ready for you yet. I was captivated by these ice covered branches on a recent walk in Ashbridges Bay Park. This is a different sort of blooming, the cold, hard, […]

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The cold, dry winter of our discontent

This time last year, it was raining. There was snow on the ground… you remember what snow is, don’t you? Not just that baby powdering we got yesterday that almost melted by today. In December 2009 and January 2010, Toronto had roughly one-quarter of our usual snowfall. It looks like February is following the same […]

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