Doors Open Toronto – Gardens

This weekend, May 24 and 25, Doors Open Toronto 2008 gives you free access to a number of spaces in the city. The theme this year is Sacred Spaces, Sacred Circles, so churches and other spiritual edifices are highlighted. All gardeners know that gardens are amongst the most sacred of earth’s spaces. Some of the […]

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Guerrilla Gardeners take note

We do a little unofficial guerilla gardening in our neck o’th’woods. But I’m now on Toronto Public Space Committee mailing list, so am apprised of the activities of this official unofficial movement. Here are the details, in case you’re interested in doing a little subversive sowing: Guerilla Gardeners 2008 Spring Event Dates Announced: – 2008 […]

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Just wild about Allan (Gardens)

Every child who grew up in or near Toronto probably has a memory of Allan Gardens. Even if it’s a “child at heart” like me who visited for the first time in my early 20s when my yet-to-be-husband and I were lucky enough to live a block away. Since then, my sister Sarah and I […]

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Canada Blooms: Why we go, 5

5. Flower Power Don’t forget that Canada Blooms is about blooms – and equal partners with Landscape Ontario in the show is the Garden Club of Toronto. This is a not-for-profit group of amateur (in the true “loving” sense of the word) and often insanely talented floral designers and horticulturists. They are the force that […]

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Canada Blooms: Why we go, 4

4. Grand larceny You might be unable to afford all that limestone hardscaping or the wrought-iron fencing or the brilliant “exterior designers”. But there’s one thing every gardener can afford at Canada Blooms: free ideas to steal. Wantonly and with abandon. To wit: the watering can fountain in my own garden, pictured on the right; […]

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Canada Blooms: Why we go, 3

Next in line in our Canada Blooms reasons why series: 3. Escape from winter The Ides of March are approaching. The snowdrops and bluebells are buried under the foot or more of snow on the ground in Toronto. And then there is Canada Blooms; Canada Blooms, where the hyacinths fly for the winter. We go […]

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Canada Blooms: Why we go, 2

This continues our series about why, despite everything, we keep returning to Canada Blooms: 2. Rekindling the passion Within the spidery network of the Internet, I’ll probably regret using this term, but one thing you’re always sure to get at Canada Blooms is what I call “garden pornography.” We go to get all lathered up […]

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Canada Blooms: Why we go

I’ve visited Canada Blooms almost every year since it began; often as a volunteer, sometimes as a civilian. After a few start-up pains (like that first year way out by the airport) and a few glory years (remember Janet Rosenberg’s spectacular garden designs for Loblaws?), Canada’s largest indoor garden show has settled into something of […]

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The Island in winter

Everyone loves that ferry ride to Toronto Islands in the summertime. It’s the perfect antidote to city heat. Who but its residents visit the island in winter? Last September 2007, some friends and I met on Ward’s Island to do the Terry Fox 10K and we made a pact — Let’s visit the islands at […]

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Toronto Island Girl

When was the last time you went out to the Island? This weekend, I was there for the Terry Fox walk and found it such a spiritual holiday that I made a pact with a friend to do it again; at least once a season. The open-topped ride to Ward’s Island is the skooter version […]

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Love/Hate in Raccoon City

Toronto, once again standing in for some American city in the movie Resident Evil, was seen bearing the emblem “Raccoon City.” So fitting. Our city has one of the world’s most abundant raccoon populations, or so they say. At least five of them are now living and poohing on the roof of our little cedar […]

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Coxwell Avenue, I

Sarah & I started this blog because we were interested in real gardens by real people – not in adventures in hardscaping. Though, frankly, if either of us had a few hundred thou to spare for hardscaping, we wouldn’t quibble, Sybil. Hardscaping, of course, is the expensive part of the garden, usually requiring tonnes of […]

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